The Still Room

awonderfulwickedduke-200During the Regency era, which some say includes half of the 1700’s and well into the latter part of the 1800’s, a specific room in the great houses of the day had been created near the kitchen called the Still Room. Its use changed over the years as medicine became more specialized and apothecaries opened. Before that, the woman of the house was expected to study and become adept at creating medicine and recipes for various household tasks as well as food recipes for the cook.

Caroline has become proficient in the Still Room arts and sciences and, as we join them, is preoccupied with creating a poultice for the duke’s knee which is badly swollen (even as the duke’s mind seems to be centered on her seduction). Eventually she gives way to a groom who tends the horses and is familiar with folk recipes for joints. The duke suffers her administrations with ill-humour and gratitude intermingled.

“He nuzzled her neck and rubbed his face in her hair, then pulled back in surprise. Caro? Do you know you smell like an apothecary shop?” She laughed then and turned his face to her.”

The mystery of the impediment between Caroline and her duke is discovered and a chance for their happiness begun in A WONDERFUL, WICKED DUKE. Enjoy the journey toward their happily-ever-after with them.
Emma Lane

Click here for an excerpt from the book!

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2 thoughts on “The Still Room

  1. When I was 4 or 5 and living in my grandfather, Robert Field’s, home that had been built in Jericho, Vermont in 1780, I remember that there was a room off of the kitchen and pantry that was called the ‘still room’.
    I was never allowed in and never knew what it was.
    Very interesting to read your writing about it.
    Eris

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